Debianhelp.co.uk
Debian Security   [more] [xml]
 2015-01-30 DSA-3147 openjdk-6 - security update

Several vulnerabilities have been discovered in OpenJDK, an implementation of the Oracle Java platform, resulting in the execution of arbitrary code, information disclosure or denial of service.

 2015-01-30 DSA-3146 requests - security update

Jakub Wilk discovered that in requests, an HTTP library for the Python language, authentication information was improperly handled when a redirect occured. This would allow remote servers to obtain two different types of sensitive information: proxy passwords from the Proxy-Authorization header (CVE-2014-1830), or netrc passwords from the Authorization header (CVE-2014-1829).

 2015-01-30 DSA-3145 privoxy - security update

Multiple vulnerabilities were discovered in Privoxy, a privacy enhancing HTTP proxy, which might result in denial of service.


Debian Wiki   [more] [xml]
 2015-02-01T02:42:19Z DebianEdu/Documentation/Jessie/Installation
 2015-02-01T02:33:17Z DebianEdu/Documentation/Wheezy/Installation
typo
 2015-02-01T02:20:20Z InstallingDebianOn/Thinkpad/T420/jessie
Fix firmware update link

Linuxtoday.com   [more] [xml]
 Sat, 31 Jan 2015 14:00:00 -0800 Report: Docker Not Yet Widely Used in the Cloud

ServerWatch: Canonical, the lead commercial sponsor behind the open-source Ubuntu Linux operation system has published its latest Ubuntu Server and Cloud Survey, showing the latest trends in server and cloud deployments

 Sat, 31 Jan 2015 10:00:00 -0800 How I landed a job in open source
 Sat, 31 Jan 2015 06:00:00 -0800 How to create and show a presentation from the command line on Linux

 xmodulo: Often times, the purpose of a presentation is to convey specific information, which can easily be done with textual messages.


OSNews   [more] [xml]
 Fri, 30 Jan 2015 23:49:07 GMT MPW on Mac OS X
Back in the days of Mac OS X 10.2-10.4, I toyed with backporting some of my programming projects, originally developed in Carbon with Project Builder, to MacOS 9, and downloaded MPW (since it was free, and CodeWarrior was not) to do so. The Macintosh Programmer’s Workshop was Apple’s own development environment for developing Mac apps, tracing its lineage from the Lisa Programmer’s Workshop, which was originally the only way to develop Mac apps (yes, in 1984 you could not develop Mac software on the Mac itself). A follow-up from last week's MPW story.
 Fri, 30 Jan 2015 23:45:41 GMT Tizen-powered Samsung Z1 doesn't avoid Google's ecosystem
Following delays of over a year, Samsung finally shipped its first Tizen-powered handset, the Z1, earlier this month in India. The arrival of Tizen on smartphones - remember it's been on Samsung's Gear smartwatches for almost a year now - has been a long time coming, and there's been plenty of speculation among press and mobile industry watchers that Tizen could emerge as a viable alternative to Android for the Korean electronics giant. What we've found during our initial hands-on time with an Indian Samsung Z1, however, is a phone that's very much at ease with Google's ecosystem. I want one of these - if only to see what Samsung can build if they're not just shipping Android.
 Fri, 30 Jan 2015 21:04:43 GMT LibreOffice 4.4 released
The highlight of the new release is a far-reaching visual refresh, with menus, toolbars, status bars, and more being updated to look and work better. While LibreOffice retains the traditional menus-and-toolbars approach that Microsoft abandoned in Office 2007, the new version is meant to make those menus and toolbars easier to navigate. What are the reasons to use either OpenOffice or LibeOffice?
 Thu, 29 Jan 2015 23:46:00 GMT Report: Apple gives Chinese government access to source code
While there was no other information available on the paper’s website, the tweet echoes a report in the Beijing News (link in Chinese) that Apple chief executive Tim Cook informed Lu last month that Apple would let China's State Internet Information Office conduct "security checks" on all products that it sells on the mainland. China has been concerned that Apple devices like the iPhone enable the company - or worse, US intelligence agencies - to spy on Chinese citizens. [...] What would "security checks" entail? Apple hasn't provided any information on the matter and did not respond to requests for comment. But analysts said the most likely interpretation is that the company is giving Beijing access to its operating system source code in return for being able to continue to do business in China - arguably Apple's most important market, but one that has been imperiled by regulatory obstacles. This whole story seems highly unlikely to me. If Apple were to give the Chinese government access to the iOS source code, it'd leak all around the web in no-time. Even if Apple could somehow get a 100% guarantee that there would be no leaks, this whole thing seems incredibly un-Apple. Then again - it may simply be a fait accompli for Apple; if the Chinese government demands source code access in order for Apple to keep operating in the Chinese market, Apple may simply have no choice but to comply. Even if this story is true, the only possible way I could remotely see this work is Apple setting up a special, dedicated office on its own premises where Chinese government officials get a peek.
 Thu, 29 Jan 2015 23:33:27 GMT How I built the developer's dream keyboard
Working one day in August of 2007, I couldn't help but realize that my regular PC keyboard didn't serve me as much as possible. I had to move my hands between the various blocks of my keyboard excessively, hundreds if not thousands of times per day, and my hands were uncomfortably close to each other. There must be a better way, I thought. This realization was followed by an overwhelming feeling of excitement as I thought about creating the perfect hacker keyboard 0 and later, the realization that, as a software developer, I was hopelessly clueless about hardware.
 Thu, 29 Jan 2015 21:53:18 GMT Apple's crazy iPhone sales prove that hardware still matters
As vast and sophisticated as the mobile tech industry may have become, in the end it still relies on some very basic ways for making money. You can either sell hardware, like Apple's doing, or sell ads, which account for roughly the same proportion of Google's regular income. Netflix and Amazon's Kindle store have found success as cross-platform services, but spending on mobile software is unlikely to ever match that of the old days when we paid for Windows, Office, and Photoshop on the desktop. It's easier to sell things that a person can touch and interact with physically. This is why HTC is diversifying into selling weird cameras, why LG and Samsung keep churning out new smartwatches in search of a perfect formula, and why everyone at CES earlier this month had a wearable of some kind to show off. And in spite of their lamentations about tough competition, HTC, LG, and Lenovo are all generating profits from their smartphone operations, and Samsung's recent sales decline hasn't been enough to put the Korean company on the wrong side of the ledger. None of these manufacturers have a profit driver of the caliber of the iPhone, but they're running sustainable businesses even while relying almost wholly on Google's Android software. Just to illustrate: Apple has sold one billion iOS devices to date, and last year alone, one billion Android smartphones have been shipped (so this excludes tablets). These numbers - Apple's profits, Android devices shipped in just a year - are insane.
 Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:50:33 GMT "Have you ever kissed a girl?"
An old (2010) story from former Sun employee Jeremy Allison. David Miller wrote (at the end of a long email explaining how Sparc Linux used cache optimizations to beat Solaris on performance): "One final note. When you have to deal with SunSOFT to report a bug, how "important" do you have (ie. Fortune 500?) to be and how big of a customer do you have to be (multi million dollar purchases?) to get direct access to Sun's Engineers at Sun Quentin? With Linux, all you have to do is send me or one of the other SparcLinux hackers an email and we will attend to your bug in due time. We have too much pride in our system to ignore you and not fix the bug." To which Bryan Cantrill replied with this amazing retort: "Have you ever kissed a girl?" Talk about missing the point and underestimating the competition. The article offers an interesting look at why Sun eventually failed. I stumbled upon this story because Rob Landley mentioned the girl comment in his email about BSD/SysV.
 Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:43:24 GMT Microsoft to invest in rogue Android startup Cyanogen
Remember the nonsense from CyanogenMod CEO McMaster we talked about a few days ago? It turns out the motivation for the baseless comments from McMaster may not exactly be his own. As always, follow the money. People familiar with the matter say Microsoft is putting money into Cyanogen, which is building a version of the Android mobile-operating system outside of Google's auspices. Microsoft would be a minority investor in a roughly $70 million round of equity financing that values Cyanogen in the high hundreds of millions, one of the people said. The person said the financing round could grow with other strategic investors that have expressed interest in Cyanogen because they're also eager to diminish Google's control over Android. The identity of the other potential investors couldn't be learned. Oh right.
 Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:34:54 GMT The BSD/System V split
Rob Landley: So gcc's library bindings strongly preferring System V system calls to BSD was due to the flood of Solaris end-users dominating the late 80's gcc development community to avoid paying Ed Zander extra for Sun's Solaris compiler. This combined with Linus reading Sun workstation manuals to get a system call list gave linux a very System V flavor. Interesting - if opinionated - view on the whole situation. Not sure if all the dates check out, but it's a fun read nonetheless.
 Thu, 29 Jan 2015 17:51:24 GMT Samsung reportedly rushing to dismantle TouchWiz
TouchWiz has long been known as being far too full of bloat and unnecessary software, but the real problem with Samsung's version of Android is that these added features come with a hard hit on performance. According to a report this morning from SamMobile, the Korean company might be going as far as to remove all features from the OS that can possibly be downloaded - and this just so happens to coincide with today's market share numbers showing that Apple and Samsung were neck-and-neck in Q4. Isn't competition lovely?
 Wed, 28 Jan 2015 09:04:18 GMT "How the iPad went from massive to 'meh' in 5 short years"
At the same time, Apple hasn't figured out many new things to do with the iPad to bring back the old excitement. During the October keynote to launch the latest model, Apple executives gushed and gushed and gushed about how *thin* the new iPad was. And it is! The iPad Air 2 is thin, elegant, and so light it just might float right off your lap. But the drama is gone. The iPad is nice. You might still hang out together sometimes on the couch. But when you're done, you probably just put it down on the pile with all the magazines and mail and other stuff stacking up on the coffee table. It's just another way to waste a little time. Even with dropping iPad sales, it's still a massive business that rakes in huge amounts of money. With the amounts of money Apple rakes in, it's easy to lose perspective. That being said, the upgrade cycle for tablets appears to be a lot longer than for phones, which is why Apple isn't concerned about the iPhone 6(+) cannibalising iPad sales: iPhones are not only more expensive, they are also on a two year upgrade cycle and appear to be "free". As long as any drop in iPad sales is more than made up for in increasing iPhone sales, Apple is getting more money, not less.
 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 23:20:44 GMT Microsoft Surface sales increase by 24%
The Surface line has officially crossed the billion dollar mark for revenue demonstrating a 24% growth from the previous quarter. In other words, the big holiday season looks to have been successful in pushing the Surface Pro 3, which drove the growth, into more hands than ever. The Surface Pro is an amazingly well-built product. I'm glad it's finding modest success.
 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 23:15:46 GMT Apple Watch will be released in April
Apple CEO Tim Cook just announced that the Apple Watch will begin shipping in April. Cook revealed the shipping timeframe during Apple's quarterly earnings call with investors; the company enjoyed a blockbuster quarter backed by massive iPhone sales and huge growth in China. Now it will look to carry that success forward with the launch of Apple Watch, its first major new product since the debut of iPad in 2010. "We’re making great progress in the development of it," Cook said. He also revealed that Apple is encouraged by the response from developers and app makers so far, saying "We’re seeing some incredible innovation." The Apple Watch could be a crappy product, but with these kinds of iPhone sales numbers, even a dud would be a huge success. These numbers are beyond my comprehension.
 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 23:05:03 GMT Mezzano: operating system written in Common Lisp
Mezzano, an operating system written in Common Lisp. What is says on the tin. Instructions for building this for VirtualBox are also available.
 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 23:02:36 GMT YouTube now defaults to HTML5 video
Four years ago, we wrote about YouTube's early support for the HTML5 video tag and how it performed compared to Flash. At the time, there were limitations that held it back from becoming our preferred platform for video delivery. Most critically, HTML5 lacked support for Adaptive Bitrate (ABR) that lets us show you more videos with less buffering. Over the last four years, we've worked with browser vendors and the broader community to close those gaps, and now, YouTube uses HTML5 video by default in Chrome, IE 11, Safari 8 and in beta versions of Firefox. It seems like only yesterday that Flash was required for everything.

DistroWatch.com: News   [more] [xml]
 2015-01-31T13:50:38+00:00 Distribution Release: SolydXK 201501
Arjen Balfoort has announced the release of SolydXK 201501, an updated set of the project's Debian-based Linux distributions offering a choice of Xfce (SolydX) or KDE (SolydK) desktops: "The team has been toiling night and day to make the transition to Debian 'Jessie' and Debian 'Wheezy' as smooth....
 2015-01-29T23:32:25+00:00 Distribution Release: BackBox Linux 4.1
Raffaele Forte has announced the release of BackBox Linux 4.1, an updated build of the Ubuntu LTS-based distribution designed for penetration testing and forensic analysis tasks: "The BackBox Team is pleased to announce the updated release of BackBox Linux, the version 4.1. This release includes features such as....
 2015-01-28T09:56:42+00:00 Development Release: NethServer 6.6 Beta 1
Alessio Fattorini has announced the availability of the first beta build of NethServer 6.6, a specialist CentOS-based distribution for servers: "NethServer 6.6 Beta1 has been released and is publicly available. Highlights: first configuration wizard; software center; server SSL certificate alternative names; phone home; block of port 25 from....

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